World Shame: Child Labor

Posted on February 11, 2009

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BBC and International Labor Organization

Adyeel

The International Labour Organization (ILO) has estimated that 218 million children between the ages of five and seventeen work in developing countries. Of these, 122.3 million children work in the Asia-Pacific region, 49.3 million work in Sub-Saharan Africa, and 5.7 million work in Latin America and the Caribbean. Most working children in rural areas are found in agriculture; many children work as domestics; urban children work in trade and services, with fewer in manufacturing and construction.

Child labor ranges from four-year-olds tied to rug looms to keep them from running away, to seventeen-year-olds helping out on the family farm. In some cases, a child’s work can be helpful to him or her and to the family; working and earning can be a positive experience in a child’s growing up. This depends largely on the age of the child, the conditions in which the child works, and whether work prevents the child from going to school.

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